Resplendence, a blog from Radiant Resolution about graphic design

The Creative Process

Everyone's creative process differs. And the process can vary from project to project. During my time in the master of arts program at SCAD, I worked on developing my creative process and taking my time in each phase, as we were to document the entire process for each project. With the amazing computer programs we have today, it's easy to jump directly to the computer to begin designing. But the project first begins with research. I first begin researching what the business/event is about. What type of audience is it seeking? Where will the project appear? The next step is inspiration. Sometimes, I will begin with a blank slate. For inspiration, I like to see what other artists have done with a similar type of business/event/team, etc., or what has been done with a similar word or name. For instance, "Meridian" is a common name used for businesses, and I was able to find several logos with a quick search to see what others have already done, so that I can do something different. Other times, the client has an idea already in mind. I receive everything from screen shots of the ideas (like below) to drawings and rough sketches. It all goes on my "artboard," a collage or collection of inspiration.

Sketches follow. Some designers like to sketch using the design software, but there is something about a pencil and paper to me that is not replicated on the computer (although, it looks like the newest iPad would be a close second! Let me just drop $1000 on that one...).

I pick the best sketches or ideas to begin incorporating into my design software. I provide various samples to the client, usually without color. If a logo can't work in black and white, it won't necessarily be successful. This particular client was attached to blue being one of the logo colors, so I incorporated blue into a few different logos below. The client's original idea is placed first, with varying ideas following.

The client picks a favorite (or a few) and I begin to experiment with colors. At this point, one- and two-color logos are taken into consideration, as well as varying backgrounds. How would the final logo be altered to be on a dark background, for instance?

The final logo is chosen, and the client is satisfied. The best feeling is to have a client happy with their business' new identity. See the variations of the logo below. All variations are included with the client's completed logo. I also throw in the correct sized Facebook profile image for the business' page.

How does your creative process differ? Do you repeat several phases before your final design, or skip phases? Whatever the process, find and refine what works best for you!Save

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